7 Steps for Surviving Holiday Mercury Retrograde

Mercury goes retrograde two weeks before Christmas (December 11, 2010) in North America. Most astrologers consider the two weeks leading up to the retrograde motion to be somewhat “iffy” in terms of progress or making agreements, signing contracts, etc. as well.

As a double Virgo (Mercury rules Virgo), I have long been aware of and affected by Mercury Retrogrades. There always seem to be hiccups related to communications, agreements and contracts. Lots of delays, misunderstandings and indecisive people. It is also common for communications devices — computers, cell phones, etc., to act up.

Mercury retrograde periods are not good for starting projects that require several people to communicate effectively and be on the same page.

The retrograde continues through New Year’s Eve (throughout the world), so it is quite possible for people to misunderstand details about where they are meeting to celebrate, etc.

Mercury’s retrograde motion ends on December 29, 2010. During this retrograde (on December 21), we get a Lunar Eclipse. It’s corresponding Solar Eclipse will be January 4, 2011 — only a few days after Mercury Retrograde ends. Eclipses are about endings and clearing the way for new beginnings, sometimes abruptly. Having the eclipses coincide with Mercury retrograde can make for some real confusion around the holidays.

Mercury retrograde is GOOD for revisiting old unresolved issues and taking care of them once and for all. It seems the retrograde motion is compatible with going back energetically to deal with unfinished business. New business that is still unfinished — not so much.

Taking all that into consideration, here are my coping strategies to deal with the Holiday Mercury Retrograde:

  • Don’t start a business or initiate major projects until January 14, 2011.
  • If at all possible, postpone signing contracts, agreements, leases, etc. until about January 20, as well. If not possible to delay, make sure your lawyers scour the documents with a fine-toothed comb, checking and double-checking to make sure it says what you think it does.
  • Backup your computers and smart phones.
  • Double check your answering machines.
  • Make sure your batteries are strong in important devices, including your car.
  • Take great care in double checking party and celebration plans to make sure all participants have the same notion of what you’re doing.
  • Spend the necessary time to take care of old, unfinished business that pops up.

After all of these precautions, anything that arises should be minimal.

Copyright © 2009-2010 by Victoria Young